acutelesbian:

fencehopping:

Another dinner spent all baaa myself.

sometimes my family is around me while i’m on tumblr and i don’t really know how to explain to them what i’m looking at

(via the--galway-girl)


I miss my family so much!!! 😩

I miss my family so much!!! 😩







Why Bonehilda, what a masculine mastoid process you have!

I’m calling you Bonehugo from now on.

Why Bonehilda, what a masculine mastoid process you have!


I’m calling you Bonehugo from now on.


Loved todays Osteoarchaeology lecture - I FELT LIKE ONE OF THE INTERNS IN THE JEFFERSONIAN!! (Bones)


chris-chinnock:

I’ve been looking forward to today for ages!  Finally got to go see the ossuary at Holy Trinity Church, Rothwell, Northamptonshire.  Could have stayed for hours.  Just scanning the bones I could see revealed various bits of trauma and pathology.  Healed broken tibia, osteomalacia in the femur, possible Paget’s disease, amongst others.  OMG I didnt want to leave.  Possible research ideas abound!

(via chris-chinnock-deactivated20140)


strangeremains:

Ayako Kanda and Hayashi Mayuka took couples portraits (first 2 photographs) to another level for their senior thesis exhibition at Musashino Art University.  For the project, the artists photographed four couples, using a CT scans and x-ray machines, in various entwined positions. 

“X-ray images usually show the finite nature of our bodies composed only of matter,” say the duo. “But these couples portraits reveal a pulse that isn’t normally seen.”

I can’t help but wonder if the artists weren’t inspired by these recent archaeological finds. 

Third photograph from a Bronze Age burial unearthed in Siberia:

Last year Siberian archaeologists unearthed a Bronze Age necropolis, made up of about 600 tombs, in Staryi Tartas village of the Novosibirsk region Russia.  Dozens of these burials contain the skeletal remains of two adults embracing each other.  It was recently revealed that some of the graves contain adults and children, while others contain just children.   Archaeologists have few different theories on why they were buried together.  Some believe they are husband and wife who wanted to spend eternity together, others believe they were part of a macabre reincarnation ritual that involved the simulated intercourse.

Fourth photo is of a Roman couple discovered in October 2011

Italian archaeologists unearthed the grave of this Roman-era couple in October of 2011, and believe the man and woman were buried at the same time between the 5th and 6th century A.D. in central-northern Italy. The woman is wearing a bronze ring and appears to be gazing at her male partner. Donato Labate, the director of the excavation told Discovery News, “We believe that they were originally buried with their faces staring into each other. The position of the man’s vertebrae suggests that his head rolled after death.”

Fifth Photo is of a couple unearthed in Mantua, Italy

In 2007, archaeologists excavated a grave containing two skeletons, between 5,000 and 6,000 years old, outside of Mantua, in the village of Valdaro, Italy. They are believed to be a man and a woman who died young and were buried together. This type of grave is unique for the period because double burials are rare, much less graves with bodies positioned in this way. The media dubbed them the “Lovers of Valdaro,” even Romeo and Juliet because of the grave’s proximity to Mantua, the setting for Shakespeare’s famous play by the same name.


strangeremains:

Teeth with pipe facets. These grooves vary from person to person, and depend on the habits of the smoker.
"Clenching a pipe stem wore away the crown of the premolar to expose the pulp chamber. Heavy deposits of plaque and tobacco stains are evident.
Skull ca. 1660-1680, Patuxent Point site, Calvert County, Maryland.”
  Photo via the Smithsonian.

strangeremains:

Teeth with pipe facets. These grooves vary from person to person, and depend on the habits of the smoker.

"Clenching a pipe stem wore away the crown of the premolar to expose the pulp chamber. Heavy deposits of plaque and tobacco stains are evident.

Skull ca. 1660-1680, Patuxent Point site, Calvert County, Maryland.”

 Photo via the Smithsonian.



"Can I just..?"
"Yeah, that’s why I’m here."